Diversity in Religion & Linguistics: The Most Translated Film of All Time

Many religions, philosophers, artists, ethnicities, and individuals have a perspective on the person of Jesus. What is yours?

The “JESUS” film is the most translated film of all time—in over 1300 languages—with the script based on a 1st century Koine Greek writing from a researcher who interacted with eyewitnesses of Jesus’ life. The “JESUS” movie was filmed in Israel with a cast of more than 5,000 Israelis and Arabs.

We’d love to have you join us as we seek to host an open, respectful conversation on the community’s perspectives on the “Jesus” film. Six different clips from the translated film will be shown in the following order: English, Arabic, Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese , and Spanish, with English subtitles throughout. Each 10-15 minute clip will be followed by a question-facilitated time for you to share YOUR thoughts. Please join us for one or more clips and discussions!

In our desire to explore the complexities of human experience, we know that many people have heard about the teachings of Jesus. Philosophers have both debated and respected Jesus’ words over the past 21 centuries. Yet individuals today have many different experiences related to the person of Jesus. People have different reactions, questions & answers about the portrayal of Jesus given by the diverse religions and religious institutions around the world.

This presentation is designed to allow a visual display of the teachings and actions of Jesus, as recorded by a 1st century author, and transformed into film. To promote our connection as a community, time will be given for dialogue to reflect on how the film depiction of Jesus relates to personal experiences or beliefs.

Some questions we hope to explore…

Do you feel that the teachings of Jesus were revolutionary in his time?—In what ways? Are the teachings still revolutionary in our time?—In what ways? How have personal experiences helped form your perspective of Jesus?

The point of this presentation is not to take religious or anti-religious sides for debate but to create space for discussing personal reflections, listening to others, and having open respectful conversations.

UPDATE:
Five different sections from the translated film will be shown in the following order, with English handouts to follow-along with the script from each section:

3pm start: Map of current translation locations (over 1,300) & translation process.
3:05—Spanish clips & Dialogue
3:25—Portuguese clips & Dialogue
3:45 –Mandarin clips & Dialogue
4:10 –Japanese clips & Dialogue
4:30—Arabic clips & Dialogue
Wrap-up and Media app sharing.

Each 10-15 minute clip will be followed by a dialogue time for you to share YOUR thoughts.

Megan Perry, Deanne Reid, Whitney Lierman, and Kaci Johnson will present Diversity in Religion and Linguistics: The Most Translated Film of All Time on Wednesday, November 4, in the UC Theater from 3:00 PM — 5:00 PM.

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One thought on “Diversity in Religion & Linguistics: The Most Translated Film of All Time

  1. UPDATE:
    Five different sections from the translated film will be shown in the following order, with English handouts to follow-along with the script from each section:

    3pm start: Map of current translation locations (over 1,300) & translation process.
    3:05—Spanish clips & Dialogue
    3:25—Portuguese clips & Dialogue
    3:45 –Mandarin clips & Dialogue
    4:10 –Japanese clips & Dialogue
    4:30—Arabic clips & Dialogue
    Wrap-up and Media app sharing.

    Each 10-15 minute clip will be followed by a dialogue time for you to share YOUR thoughts.

    Like

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